White Brick School Finniwig Studios KebIrish Gazette Ariadne Threads Guild

Volume 9, Issue 4

November 1, 2006

Contents:

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Catherine Wilhelmina Euler

Forensic Genealogy

Family Update

Family Favorites - Chicken-Fried Steak

Photos of the Past

Catherine

Wilhelmina

Euler

1833—1908

On July 6, 1833 in Gerbrunn, Wurttemberg, Germany Catherine Wilhelmina Euler (pronounced “oiler”) was born to Catharine and Ludwig Euler, the only child of her parents.

She emigrated from Germany to Columbus, Ohio in 1853 at the age of 20 years old. On December 6 of the same year she married John Frederick Schmidt, Sr, the son of Michael and Barbara Schmidt of Crailsheim, Wurttemburg, Germany. Catherine and John were blessed with twelve children.

John and Lena are thought to be born before 1857.

John Frederick Jr was born March 26, 1857 and married Elizabeth Catherine Schmidt. He died on December 20, 1942.

Louise Henrietta was born February 18, 1859 and married Joseph Leo Berger, Sr. She died on April 2, 1909.

William Richard was born September 1861 and died February 21, 1948.

Barbara was born July 8, 1863. Her first husband was Mr. Paulus, Her second husband was Mr. Shay and her third husband was Diedrich Heneke. Barbara died on December 26, 1910.

Charles Schmidt is believed to be born about 1865 and died in infancy.

Margaret was born July 6, 1867 and married Jacob Grau. She died on August 10, 1932.

Rosina Margaret was born February 18, 1868 and married Herman Edward Arnold, Sr. She died on December 29, 1943.

Cathrine Mary was born February 12, 1870 and married Charles Henry Rau. She died on Marth 16, 1917.

Michael George was born January 22, 1872 and died May 7, 1958.

George Michael was born October 12, 1874 and married Anna Magdalina Becker. He died on March 29, 1921.

John Schmidt died on March 14, 1902

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Forensic Genealogy

Do you have a picture and you don’t know who it is or where or when it was taken? There are many things to look at to come up with the answers. Clothing and hairstyles cannot accurately date the photograph so you need to go beyond that.

“Forensic Genealogy” by Colleen Fitzpatrick is an excellent book to learn how to identify photographs.

The first step is to look at the back. If you are lucky there may be a name or date on the back. If it is unreadable, try using a photo editor to adjust the contrast and gamma correction. Are there other identifying marks such as a logo or name of a photo studio? These may help you date the photograph. Lot numbers from more than one photo were usually processed at the same time so other photos may help with clues. Pencil marks and logos along with the serrated, scalloped or crinkled edges can identify photos taken from the same roll and the order they were taken.

Look at specifics in the photo. Is there a street sign or address? How about business signs, railroad tracks or other identifying objects. Looking at a map will help you find the location with this information. Even a shadow can help identify a photo.

Sometimes a business sign can help date a photo. What years was that business at that location? What about other items in the picture. Was that ad or other item in the background only available for a limited time?

What about the type of photo. Is it a daguerreotype, salt print, ambrotype, tintype, or albumen print? If it is a CdV or a cabinet card, what is the thickness and image size? What are the corners and borders like? Colleen’s book gives you lots of information on how to identify the different types of photos and the years they may have been taken. An excellent guide to dating CdVs can be found at http://www.phototree.com/

phototree/main/history/hist_cdv.

htm

Events in the picture may help date it. Was it taken in New Orleans and there is snow on the ground? Then find out when it has snowed there. Is it taken at a world fair or inauguration?

Other items may be dated items. The calendar in the background, a poster, cash register, packaging of consumer products or how the people are dressed or their hairdo or mustache. None of these items date a photo by themselves but a combination of the might. Make a timeline of when each item was on the market or popular. This can narrow down the date to a few years.

The one piece of evidence in a photograph that can help to determine exactly when a photograph was taken is the size of the shadows. If there is one

item in the photo whose relative width and depth are known that has well defined shadows, the day of the year can be determined from the length of the shadow, and the time of day determined from its width. It is not necessary to know exact dimensions. Colleen’s book gives a good example on how to calculate this information.

Along with your family tree also make a database. There is a difference between data and information. Data are merely facts. They become information when meaning is attached to them. Use a spreadsheet to organize this data.

Data can be created from using a city directory, birth certificates, hospital admission records, coroners reports, information received from relative or any other data you can find. When looking up data don’t just look up a known relative. Also look up anyone with the same surname, surnames with different spellings, and people that may have lived in the same area.

Make two different databases. The first is the periodical database, a collection of data such as census records or city directories that were compiled at specific times. These databases are inventories of people. They describe a population at regular time intervals and can be used to cross reference individuals each time they appear.

The second database in the event database, containing records that were updated on a continuous basis, such as birth, marriage, and death registers and hospital admission records. The data contained in event databases usually do not involve the same individuals more than once or perhaps twice.

The one piece of evidence in a photograph that can help to determine exactly when a photograph was taken is the size of the shadows. If there is one item in the photo whose relative width and depth are known that has well defined shadows, the day of the year can be determined from the length of the shadow, and the time of day determined from its width. It is not necessary to know exact dimensions. Colleen’s book gives a good example on how to calculate this information.

Along with your family tree also make a database. There is a difference between data and information. Data are merely facts. They become information when meaning is attached to them. Use a spreadsheet to organize this data.

Data can be created from using a city directory, birth certificates, hospital admission records, coroners reports, information received from relative or any other data you can find. When looking up data don’t just

look up a known relative. Also look up anyone with the same surname, surnames with different spellings, and people that may have lived in the same area.

Make two different databases. The first is the periodical database, a collection of data such as census records or city directories that were compiled at specific times. These databases are inventories of people. They describe a population at regular time intervals and can be used to cross reference individuals each time they appear.

The second database in the event database, containing records that were updated on a continuous basis, such as birth, marriage, and death registers and hospital admission records. The data contained in event databases usually do not involve the same individuals more than once or perhaps twice.

You should then look for patterns that appear among names, dates, addresses, events or any other data. You can then resort the data to track a family through a specific address, multiple addresses, occupation, etc. This can give you order of birth, gaps in birth where another child may have been, possible causes of death, and other information. Was there a lot of deaths that occurred and the same time there was a flu epidemic going around? Are there names that keep coming up that you didn’t know about? Maybe they are relatives you didn’t have on your family tree.

You may also use this information to construct a family story. When and where they were born and married, what kinds of jobs they did, where they lived, maybe why they changed jobs or moved. Was there a war, did their place of business close, or was it just progress that put them out of a job?

Colleen’s book is an excellent resource to bring your family tree alive and put names and faces to all those pictures. She also has insights to a lot of different sources to look up information and different ways to use that information that you may not have thought of. It is full of charts and very detailed examples so you can use the information to really research your own family.

Colleen also has a website at www.forensicgenealogy.info with examples of photos and how each photo was researched. She also has a new photo quiz each month so you can learn to identify photos. You can purchase her book at this website.

 

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Family Update
Tiffany Keb recently became a staff editor on the Oregon Law Review. In order to be considered for membership on the law review she had to write a legal memorandum, as well as check  and correct fifty citations. The Law Review is a student run periodical at the University of Oregon School of Law that  publishes articles written by professors and lawyers. Congratulations Tiffany on your accomplishment and good luck for the future.

 

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Family Favorites

Chicken-Fried Steak

Ingredients:

1 tsp. Salt

1-1/2 lbs. Beef minute steaks

1/2 cup buttermilk

1 egg, lightly beaten

1-3/4 cups milk

1 Tbs. Chopped fresh parsley

4 tsp. Dry steak seasoning, preferably McCormick’s Montreal, divided

2/3 cup dry breadcrumbs, preferably garlic-and-herb seasoned

4-1/2 Tbs. All-purpose flour, divided

Oil, preferably canola

1/8 tsp. Ground nutmeg

Sprinkle salt and 2 tsp. Steak seasoning over both sides of steaks. On sheet of wax paper combine breadcrumbs with 2 Tbs. Flour. In pie pan or shallow bowl combine buttermilk with egg. Dip each steak into buttermilk mixture then breadcrumb mixture to coat. Place on wax paper. In large nonstick skillet heat 1/3 cup oil over medium-high heat. Add steaks in batches; cook, turning once, adding additional oil as necessary until golden brown, 1-2 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels; cover loosely with foil to keep warm. In pot over medium heat gradually whisk remaining flour into 3 Tbs. Oil until smooth. Cook, whisking constantly, 1 minute. Gradually whisk in milk, nutmeg and remaining steak seasoning. Bring to boil, whisking. Cook, whisking, 1 minute or until thickened and coats back of spoon. Top steaks with gravy; sprinkle with parsley.

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Photos of the Past

Ethyl Nelson

Born March 3, 1882 to Albin Nelson and Augusta Lindeen, the second of seven children.

 

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